Vane Savers & Post-it Notes


vs-&-positSo you’re probably thinking “What the…?”, with a title like that, but stick with me.  Post-it Notes are one of those simple, yet universal items that make people say “why didn’t I think of that?”.  Post-it Notes have an interesting history, and were created quite by accident.

From Wikipedia:

In 1968, Dr. Spencer Silver, a scientist at 3M in the United States, was attempting to develop a super-strong adhesive, but instead he accidentally created a “low-tack”, reusable, pressure-sensitive adhesive that has been characterized as “a solution without a problem”. For five years, Silver promoted his invention within 3M, both informally and through seminars, but without much success. In 1974, a colleague of his, Art Fry, who had attended one of Silver’s seminars, came up with the idea of using the adhesive to anchor his bookmark in his hymnbook. Fry then developed the idea by taking advantage of 3M’s officially sanctioned “permitted bootlegging” policy. 3M launched the product in stores in 1977 in four cities under the name “Press ‘n Peel”, but its results were disappointing. A year later, in 1978, 3M issued free samples to residents of Boise, Idaho, and 94 percent of the people who tried them said that they would buy the product. On April 6, 1980, the product debuted in US stores as “Post-It Notes”. In 1981, Post-its were launched in Canada and Europe.  The yellow color was chosen by accident; a lab next-door to the Post-it team only had scrap yellow paper, which the team initially used.

Complete Wiki article click here.

And what does this have to do with “Vane Savers”?  Well, probably not much, however, it is one of those products that makes many wannabe inventors say, “why didn’t I think of that?”  In the blind repair world, it certainly is.

A simple metal clip that fits over the top of a vertical vane and creates a new hole.  Brilliant!!

And, Vane Saver installation is almost as easy as using a Post-it Note:

“Why didn’t I think of that?”

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